« Anniversary Week: Truth | Main | Anniversary Week: What About Me? »

July 02, 2009

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Lauren Crane

Looks like great minds think alike [wink]. I just finished a little blog that was similarly genesis-esque.

Molly Brown

Get back to the garden. I'm there. Reminds me of a rumi quote--Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing there is a field, I'll meet you there. And it ain't Eden.

Therein lies the duality issue, eh? Right or wrong.

What would it mean to take responsibility for our suffering? It'd be a huge step in the direction of liberation, wouldn't it.

Great post, Barry. Thanks.

Barry Briggs

Lauren - We're on a roll, today!

Molly - Yes, to move beyond all separation, to take responsibility in just that way . . . well, it would change everything!

Alice

That was one delicious piece of fruit. Ummm ummm... a taste of Paradise!

Nathan

Ah ... Christianity and Buddhism - seems I've been rolling in this mud all week. I wrote a few poems awhile back about this section of Genesis. I've always found it interesting how snakes get dumped on so often in spiritual stories.

Barry Briggs

Alice - Also a taste of hell! (With which taste I'm personally more familiar!)

Nathan - I seem to recall that the "snake" was originally a lizard-like creature and that God took away its legs in punishment for seducing Adam and Eve. Slippery, crawly things!

Marie Drennan

Pema Chodron has a little chapter called Drive All Blames Into One (in Comfortable with Uncertainty) that resonates -- ultimately all "blame" comes down to the insistent needs and wants of ego, not from outside. I think of it as waiting for pedestrians to get out of the crosswalk so I can go through: they're not doing anything wrong, they're not in the wrong place at the wrong time, there's no problem except that I can only think of where I want to be.

I wrote my thesis on Genesis (1 and 3) and now I find that another Buddhist idea is present there: the world outside of Eden is not an evil place -- it's just dukkha. It's a Noble Truth. The Eden story describes the entry into a difficult and dualistic environment, but the whole OT is deeply appreciative of the entire created world. There's a strong sense of celebration and respect in coming to terms with the world exactly as it is. Though this gets lost a little in the NT...

Anyhoo, thank you for another wonderful post!

Stuart

Yo, Barry, I just discovered your blogs.

I once spent the better part of an acid trip realizing how the Adam & Eve story perfectly fits our own story of coming into self-conscious existence. We eat the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil (opposites-thinking appears), then realize that we're naked (I/my/me appears).

Re blame... I've noticed that when I'm riding my bicycle and have a close call to colliding with a car, my first, immediate thought is ALWAYS that the driver of the car screwed up (the bastard!). It's only a few seconds later that I even consider the possibility that I share some of the fault.

It's amazing... the level of certainty I initially feel that the other guy was to blame. Even though it's, y'know, highly improbable mathematically that I'm ALWAYS in the right.

Barry Briggs

Hi Stuart,
Thanks for your spot-on comment - and also the heads-up about your blog. I look forward to visiting you!

Barry

The comments to this entry are closed.

About

  • Zen teachers sometimes use the Ten Ox Herding Pictures to describe the path of awakening. Within this metaphorical framework, the ox symbolizes the secretive, unruly human mind.

My Other Weblogs

Comments

  • I’m truly grateful to everyone who leaves a comment on this blog. Even though many comments are generous and thoughtful, I rarely respond. Thank you for your understanding.

American Zen

Thanks!

  • I extend grateful appreciation to my daughter, Susie, who designed this site; to Zen Master Seung Sahn, for crossing the ocean; and to all beings for their never-ending encouragement and teaching.
  • May we together attain enlightenment and save all beings from suffering.

Free e-Books

Finding the Ox