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November 29, 2014

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adam fisher

No disrespect intended, but the older I get, the more I think students would be well advised to take spiritual tales as, yes, inspiring, but also with an unflinching knowledge that they are simply unverifiable tales.

I am a fan of Seung Sahn, and always liked what he had to say, but if the man went on a 100-day SOLO retreat, I have no way of knowing what actually happened outside his word on it. I am thankful for the information, but I suspect Seung Sahn would be the first to encourage others not to take his word for it. Ditto Gautama and whatever other 'teacher' is chosen.

It's not a criticism. Rather, it points out that without personal verification -- no screwing around -- holy places and deep veneration, while nice, simply don't/can't fill the bill. My view: Venerate to your heart's content, but have the courtesy to find out.

Joseph

I ought to try to make it here for a visit.

I hope no one fell!

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  • Zen teachers sometimes use the Ten Ox Herding Pictures to describe the path of awakening. Within this metaphorical framework, the ox symbolizes the secretive, unruly human mind.

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